About

seelye_bioSeelye Martin received his Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Johns Hopkins University in 1967 then spent two years as a research associate in the Department of Meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1969 he took up a position in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington where he is now an Emeritus Professor. Beginning in 1987, he taught courses on remote sensing of the oceans. Professor Martin has been involved with passive microwave, visible/infrared and radar ice research since 1979, and has served on a number of NASA and NOAA committees and panels involving remote sensing and high latitude processes. He has made many trips to the Arctic for research on sea ice properties and oceanography. From 2006-2008, he worked at NASA Headquarters as Program Manager for the Cryosphere, where he also served as program scientist for the ICESat-1 and ICESat-2 missions. After leaving Headquarters, from 2009 -2012, he worked in a variety of roles for the NASA high-latitude IceBridge remote sensing aircraft program. For this work, in 2012 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal.

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One Response to About

  1. Hello Prof.Martin,

    I have started working on Ocean Wave Spectra Retrieval using SAR data. After following through many articles i could gain some understanding of the topic , but i keep getting these questions like how do you understand wave information when you are looking at a single image , since SAR satellites like RISAT-1,RISAT-2 has a repetivity of 25 days and the wave phenomenon is very dynamic . I tried to understand the wave retrieval but i couldn’t progress much after calculating a FFT of a sample SAR image. Could you please share your knowledge on how do you understand and derive ocean wave characteristics through SAR data

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